<programming language>

1. An expression-based language developed by J.C. Cleaveland in 1978.

2. A string-processing language with single-character commands from Tandem Computers.

3. A language for system specification of simulation execution.

["System Description and the DELTA Language", E. Holback-Hansen et al, DELTA Proj Rep 4, Norweg Comput Ctr, Feb 1977].

4. A COBOL generating language produced by Delta Software Entwicklung GmbH.

(01 May 2000)

delphinoid, delphinoidea, delphinus, delphi technique < Prev | Next > Delta, delta, delta-13 fatty acid desaturase

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Neurogenic locus in Drosophila. Gene product contains 9 repeats of the EGF like domain.

This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology

(11 Mar 2008)

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1. A quantitative change, especially a small or incremental one (this use is general in physics and engineering). "I just doubled the speed of my program!" "What was the delta on program size?" "About 30 percent." (He doubled the speed of his program, but increased its size by only 30 percent.)

2. [Unix] A diff, especially a diff stored under the set of version-control tools called SCCS (Source Code Control System) or RCS (Revision Control System). See change management.

3. A small quantity, but not as small as epsilon. The jargon usage of delta and epsilon stems from the traditional use of these letters in mathematics for very small numerical quantities, particularly in "epsilon-delta" proofs in limit theory (as in the differential calculus). The term delta is often used, once epsilon has been mentioned, to mean a quantity that is slightly bigger than epsilon but still very small. "The cost isn't epsilon, but it's delta" means that the cost isn't totally negligible, but it is nevertheless very small. Common constructions include "within delta of ---", "within epsilon of ---": that is, "close to" and "even closer to".

(01 May 2000)