hand-schueller-christian diseasemedical dictionary

<radiology> Form of histiocytosis, age 1 - 3 yrs most common, skeletal lesions similar to EG, but more numerous, adenopathy, enlarged liver and spleen, skin lesions, diabetes insipidus, exophthalmos, lung disease

(12 Dec 1998)

handpiece, hand pile, hand ratio, hand-roll < Prev | Next > hand-schueller-christian syndrome

Bookmark with: icon icon icon icon iconword visualiser Go and visit our forums Community Forums

hand-schueller-christian syndromemedical dictionary

<syndrome>

Disseminated, chronic form of langerhans-cell histiocytosis. It may exhibit the classic triad of exophthalmos, diabetes insipidus, and bone destruction.

(12 Dec 1998)

Hand-Schuller-Christian diseasemedical dictionary

Preferred term: histiocytosis

1. A sale, gift, or delivery into the hand of another; especially, a sale, gift, delivery, or using which is the first of a series, and regarded as on omen for the rest; a first installment; an earnest; as the first money received for the sale of goods in the morning, the first money taken at a shop newly opened, the first present sent to a young woman on her wedding day, etc. "Their first good handsel of breath in this world." (Fuller) "Our present tears here, not our present laughter, Are but the handsels of our joys hereafter." (Herrick)

2. Price; payment. Handsel Monday, the first Monday of the new year, when handsels or presents are given to servants, children, etc.

Origin: OE. Handsal, hansal, hansel, AS. Handslena giving into hands, or more prob. Fr. Icel. Handsal; hand hand + sal sale, bargain; akin to AS. Sellan to give, deliver. See Sell, Sale.

(01 Mar 1998)

Preferred term: handshaking

1. Predetermined hardware or software activity designed to establish or maintain two machines or programs in synchronisation. Handshaking often concerns the exchange of messages or packets of data between two systems with limited buffers. A simple handshaking protocol might only involve the receiver sending a message meaning "I received your last message and I am ready for you to send me another one." A more complex handshaking protocol might allow the sender to ask the receiver if he is ready to receive or for the receiver to reply with a negative acknowledgement meaning "I did not receive your last message correctly, please resend it" (e.g. if the data was corrupted en route).

Hardware handshaking uses voltage levels or pulses on wires to carry the handshaking signals whereas software handshaking uses data units (e.g. ASCII characters) carried by some underlying communication medium.

Flow control in bit-serial data transmission such as EIA-232 may use either hardware or software handshaking.

2. The method used by two modems to establish contact with each other and to agreee on baud rate, error correction and compression protocols.

3. The exchange of predetermined signals between agents connected by a communications channel to assure each that it is connected to the other (and not to an imposter). This may also include the use of passwords and codes by an operator.

(01 Jan 1995)

1. Dexterous; skillful; handy; ready; convenient; applied to things as persons. "That they [engines of war] be both easy to be carried and handsome to be moved and turned about." (Robynson (Utopia)) "For a thief it is so handsome as it may seem it was first invented for him." (Spenser)

2. Agreeable to the eye or to correct taste; having a pleasing appearance or expression; attractive; having symmetry and dignity; comely; expressing more than pretty, and less than beautiful; as, a handsome man or woman; a handsome garment, house, tree, horse.

3. Suitable or fit in action; marked with propriety and ease; graceful; becoming; appropriate; as, a handsome style, etc. "Easiness and handsome address in writing." (Felton)

4. Evincing a becoming generosity or nobleness of character; liberal; generous. "Handsome is as handsome does." (Old Proverb)

5. Ample; moderately large. "He . . . Accumulated a handsome sum of money." (V. Knox) To do the handsome thing, to act liberally.

Synonyms: Handsome, Pretty.

Pretty applies to things comparatively small, which please by their delicacy and grace; as, a pretty girl, a pretty flower, a pretty cottage. Handsome rises higher, and is applied to objects on a larger scale. We admire what is handsome, we are pleased with what is pretty. The word is connected with hand, and has thus acquired the idea of training, cultivation, symmetry, and proportion, which enters so largely into our conception of handsome. Thus Drayton makes mention of handsome players, meaning those, who are well trained; and hence we speak of a man's having a handsome address, which is the result of culture; of a handsome horse or dog, which implies well proportioned limbs; of a handsome face, to which, among other qualities, the idea of proportion and a graceful contour are essential; of a handsome tree, and a handsome house or villa. So, from this idea of proportion or suitableness, we have, with a different application, the expressions, a handsome fortune, a handsome offer.

Origin: Hand + -some. It at first meant, dexterous; cf. D. Handzaam dexterous, ready, limber, manageable, and E. Handy.

(01 Mar 1998)

hands-on/minds-on activitieseducation dictionary

Activities that engage students' physical as well as mental skills to solve problems. Students devise a solution strategy, predict outcomes, activate or perform the strategy, reflect on results, and compare end results with predictions.

(14 Jan 2009)

handsel, handshake, handshaking, handsome < Prev | Next > handspike, hand strength, hand surgeon

Bookmark with: icon icon icon icon iconword visualiser Go and visit our forums Community Forums

A bar or lever, generally of wood, used in a windlass or capstan, for heaving anchor, and, in modified forms, for various purposes.

(01 Mar 1998)

handshaking, handsome, hands-on/minds-on activities < Prev | Next > hand strength, hand surgeon, handwashing

Bookmark with: icon icon icon icon iconword visualiser Go and visit our forums Community Forums

hand strengthmedical dictionary

Force exerted when gripping or grasping.

(12 Dec 1998)

handsome, hands-on/minds-on activities, handspike < Prev | Next > hand surgeon, handwashing, handwave

Bookmark with: icon icon icon icon iconword visualiser Go and visit our forums Community Forums

hand surgeonmedical dictionary

<specialist>

A physician specialist expert in the surgical case management of hand disorders.

(27 Sep 1997)

hands-on/minds-on activities, handspike, hand strength < Prev | Next > handwashing, handwave, hand-winged

Bookmark with: icon icon icon icon iconword visualiser Go and visit our forums Community Forums