The structure of strings in some language. A language's syntax is described by a grammar. For example, the syntax of a binary number could be expressed as

binary_number = bit [ binary_number ]

bit = "0" | "1"

meaning that a binary number is a bit optionally followed by a binary number and a bit is a literal zero or one digit.

The meaning of the language is given by its semantics.

See also: abstract syntax, concrete syntax.

(01 Mar 1994)

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The structure of a language, or the rules which specify how grammatical markers and words are combined to make meaningful sentences; the part of speech of a word (for instance, noun or adverb).

(14 Jan 2009)

syntactic salt, syntactic sugar, syntality, syntax < Prev | Next > syntax, Syntax-Case, syntax directed translation

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1. Connected system or order; union of things; a number of things jointed together; organism. "They owe no other dependence to the first than what is common to the whole syntax of beings." (Glanvill)

2. That part of grammar which treats of the construction of sentences; the due arrangement of words in sentences in their necessary relations, according to established usage in any language.

Origin: L. Syntaxis, Gr, fr. To put together in order; with + to put in order; cf. F. Syntaxe. See Syn-, and Tactics.

(01 Mar 1998)

syntactic sugar, syntality, syntax, syntax < Prev | Next > Syntax-Case, syntax directed translation

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