<computer programming> One of a sequence of copies of a program, each incorporating new modifications. Each version is usually identified by a number, commonly of the form X.Y where X is the major version number and Y is the release number. Typically an increment in X (with Y reset to zero) signifies a substantial increase in the function of the program or a partial or total re-implementation, whereas Y increases each time the progam is changed in any way and re-released.

Version numbers are useful so that the user can know if the program has changed (bugs have been fixed or new functions added) since he obtained his copy and the programmer can tell if a bug report relates to the current version. It is thus always important to state the version when reporting bugs. Statements about compatibility between different software components should always say which versions they apply to.

See change management.

(01 Mar 1997)

1. A change of form, direction, or the like; transformation; conversion; turning. "The version of air into water." (Bacon)

2. <medicine> A condition of the uterus in which its axis is deflected from its normal position without being bent upon itself. See Anteversion, and Retroversion.

3. The act of translating, or rendering, from one language into another language.

4. A translation; that which is rendered from another language; as, the Common, or Authorised, Version of the Scriptures (see under Authorised); the Septuagint Version of the Old Testament.

5. An account or description from a particular point of view, especially as contrasted with another account; as, he gave another version of the affair.

Origin: F, from L. Vertere, versum, to turn, to change, to translate. See Verse.

(01 Mar 1998)